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Lamartine Griffin Hardman Papers, Series XI: Artifacts

Lamartine Griffin Hardman Papers, Series XI: Artifacts

Descriptive Summary

Title: Lamartine Griffin Hardman Papers, Series XI: Artifacts
Creator: Hardman, Lamartine Griffin, 1856-1937
Inclusive Dates: 1900-1930
Language: English
Extent: 20 box(es)
Collection Number: RBRL/137/LGH_XI
Repository: Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies
Abstract: Lamartine Griffin Hardman Papers, Series XI: Artifacts consists of personal effects, wardrobe items, and assorted medical equipment. Material includes campaign and convention buttons, calling cards and miscellaneous printed matter, and a variety of loose personal items--address and memo books, eyeglasses, coins, pipes, gavels and small plaques. Additionally, there are two dresses belonging to Mrs. Emma G. Hardman, a plaster head used for phrenology, and plaques that hung in Harmony Grove Mills honoring those who served during World War II.

Collection Description

Biographical Note

Reputedly one of the wealthiest men in North Georgia at the turn of the century, Dr. Lamartine G. Hardman was a man who had diverse interests in a number of areas. Not only was he a physician, business man, manufacturer, and farmer, he was also a statesman.

One of ten children, Lamartine Griffin Hardman was born on April 14, 1856 in Harmony Grove (now Commerce), Georgia to Dr. William Benjamin Johnson and Susan Elizabeth Colquitt Hardman. His father was a physician and Baptist minister. From the Colquitt side of the family, Lamartine Hardman inherited his political aspirations. There had been four governors in Georgia and Texas in the Colquitt family.

Hardman graduated from the Georgia Medical College in Augusta in 1876. He furthered his medical training at Bellevue Hospital in New York. Afterwards, he continued his graduate studies in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the New York Polyclinic and Guy Hospital in London, graduating from the latter institution in 1900.

Returning from his extended studies, Dr. Hardman arrived in Commerce to begin his medical practice. With his brother, Dr. William B. Hardman, they opened the Hardman Sanatorium in 1899. "They introduced into the hospital advanced apparatus and before 1900 Dr. L.G. Hardman was a nationally known physician." The sanatorium served a large number of patients in the northeast Georgia area until 1945.

During this period, Dr. Hardman continued his research in the field of anesthetics. He had completely anesthetized an animal by injecting tincture of Indian Hemp into the femoral vein of a dog. This work brought him into close touch with the work of Dr. Crawford W. Long, traditionally considered the first to have used ether as an anesthetic in surgery.

Besides his medical practice and research, Dr. Hardman wanted to create better manufacturing facilities in Georgia to facilitate economic growth in this rural area. He first acquired the Harmony Grove Cotton Mills in Commerce. Then he later established the Hardman Roller Mills.

While he was creating a manufacturing boom in Commerce, he was also buying farm lands. By 1900, he was one of the largest farmers in Georgia, owning land in seven counties.

From walnuts to livestock, Dr. Hardman was an example of a successful scientific farmer. He would try out experiments on his produce and, if they worked, allow his neighbors to benefit from his successes. The experiments also increased Dr. Hardman's interest in agriculture education, which was later reflected in his service on the board of trustees of the Georgia Agriculture College in Athens.

To accommodate his venture, Hardman desired adequate banking facilities in northeast Georgia. He established the Northeastern Banking Company at Commerce and served as its president. Also, he started the Hardman Drug Company and the Commerce Telephone Company.

Not being entirely overwhelmed by responsibility, Dr. Hardman accepted the challenge of political life with encouragement from his friends and colleagues. He was elected to the Georgia legislature in 1902 as a representative from Jackson County, which he served as until 1907. He was then elected to the Senate and served there until 1910. During his term of service in the General Assembly, Hardman introduced the following legislation: a bill requiring public schools to offer elementary agriculture; a measure petitioning the United States Congress to send a commission to conduct a drainage survey in Georgia; an act furnishing free distribution of diphtheric anti-toxin for children in Georgia; a proposal rendering free treatment for hydrophobia with the Pasteur method; and legislation establishing the State Board of Health.

In 1907, Dr. Hardman, along with W. A. Covington and W. J. Neel, authored the prohibition bill which banished legalized whiskey from Georgia. He received a lot of favorable mail from around the country congratulating him on this victory. As a physician and son of a Baptist minister, Hardman believed that alcohol was destructive to the human body and saw no good from it.

1907 was also an important year for Dr. Hardman on the personal side. At the age of 51, he married the twenty-five-year-old Emma Wiley Griffin from Valdosta. They had met in 1901 when introduced by W. W. Landrum, an Atlanta preacher. On a bet, Landrum promised to introduce the matrimony-proof Hardman to a young woman in Valdosta if on their wedding day he would give the Baptist mission $1,000. After six years of courtship they married.

Emma Griffin was from a socially prominent family in Valdosta. She was active in the Baptist Union Mission, the Daughters of the Confederacy, as well as a trustee of Mercer University. They had four children-- Lamartine, Josephine, Sue, and Emma.

During World War I, Hardman served as the U. S. Fuel Administrator for Georgia. After two unsuccessful attempts (1914 and 1916), he was elected governor in 1926 over John Holder, who was the controversial chairman of the highway board, in a run-off election. Hardman promised to remove Holder from office during his campaign because of fiscal mismanagement in the highway department. However, due to Holder's strong influence in the Senate, Hardman was unable to make any significant change in personnel or organization in that department. In 1928, he comfortably defeated E. D. Rivers in his re-election for governor.

Hardman promised to give the state a businesslike administration and to eliminate waste and extravagance. On the occasion of his second inauguration as governor in 1929, Dr. Hardman said: "It is apparent in our state, and indeed in most, if not all the states in the Union, that there is a need and a demand for a more modern, businesslike arrangement of operating the state's affairs that will simplify our plan of operation, and thereby suggest to us equality and justice in the support of our state government and our state institutions." In that same speech, he recommended the creation of the State University Agriculture College, a public health program, and preservation of the "the majesty and enforcement of the law."

Unfortunately, the legislature was unwilling to accept dramatic changes. Although he was unable to accomplish what he set forth, Hardman was not without achievements. Under his administration the state capitol was remodeled, the Rhodes home in Atlanta was accepted as a depository for the state archives, and a plant to produce license tags was obtained. However, his most significant contribution as governor was laying the groundwork for a comprehensive reorganization of the state's government through the Allen Commission on Simplification and Coordination, headed by Ivan Allen, Sr. Efficient government was Hardman's continuous theme as governor. The plan would be achieved under the administration of Richard B. Russell, Jr., his successor.

After a short illness, Hardman died on February 18, 1937. He was buried in Gray Hill Cemetery in Commerce.

Scope and Content

Series XI: Artifacts consists of personal effects, wardrobe items, and assorted medical equipment. Material includes campaign and convention buttons, calling cards and miscellaneous printed matter, and a variety of loose personal items--address and memo books, eyeglasses, coins, pipes, gavels and small plaques. Additionally, there are two dresses belonging to Mrs. Emma G. Hardman, a plaster head used for phrenology, and plaques that hung in Harmony Grove Mills honoring those who served during World War II.

Organization and Arrangement

The artifacts are loosely grouped by item type.


Administrative Information

User Restrictions

Library acts as "fair use" reproduction agent.

Preferred Citation

Lamartine Griffin Hardman Papers, Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies, The University of Georgia Libraries.

Access Restrictions

Use of microfilm recommended.

Copyright Information

Before material from collections at the Richard B. Russell Library may be quoted in print, or otherwise reproduced, in whole or in part, in any publication, permission must be obtained from (1) the owner of the physical property, and (2) the holder of the copyright. It is the particular responsibility of the researcher to obtain both sets of permissions. Persons wishing to quote from materials in the Russell Library collection should consult the Director. Reproduction of any item must contain a complete citation to the original.

Finding Aid Publication

Finding aid prepared on: 2000.


Related Materials and Subjects

Subject Terms

Georgia. General Assembly. House of Representatives.
Georgia. General Assembly. Senate.
Georgia. Governor (1927-1931: Hardman)
Hardman, Emma
Medicine -- Practice -- Georgia.
Physicians -- Georgia.

Related Collections in this Repository

Hoke Smith Papers

Richard B. Russell, Jr. Collection

Dudley M. Hughes Papers

Richard B. Russell, Sr. Papers

Hugh Peterson, Sr. Papers

Related Collections in Other Repositories

Ivan Allen, Sr. Papers, Atlanta History Center


Series Descriptions and Folder Listing

 

XI. Artifacts

20 box(es)
This series consists of personal effects, wardrobe items, and assorted medical equipment. Material includes campaign and convention buttons, calling cards and miscellaneous printed matter, and a variety of loose personal items--address and memo books, eyeglasses, coins, pipes, gavels and small plaques. Additionally, there are two dresses belonging to Mrs. Emma G. Hardman, a plaster head used for phrenology, and plaques that hung in Harmony Grove Mills honoring those who served during World War II.
box
1Medical equipment
box
2Medical bag
box
3Phrenology head
box
4Medical equipment
box
5Ribbons, buttons, and medals
box
6Gavels
box
7Medical equipment
box
8Medical bag with equipment
box
9Calling cards, memo books, autograph book
box
10Surgery kit
box
11Ribbons
box
12Medical equipment, medical bag
box
13Microscopical preparations, glass bottle, brass knuckles, pipe, bag of seed
box
14Plaques that hung in Harmony Grove Mills honoring those who served in World War II
box
15Wooden trunk
box
16Emma G. Hardman's dresses
box
17Medical teaching skeleton
box
18Emma G. Hardman's blanket and beaded bag, undated
box
19Emma Hardman's quilt, undated
box
20Walking stick presented to Lamartine Hardman in commemoration of his performing the first appendectomy in Georgia